Executive Board and Committee Chairs
Vice President /
President
Secretary
Treasurer
Finances / Fundraising Chair
Foundation Chair
Membership Chair
Public Relations
Website Administration
Bulletin Editor
Club Administration
Sergeant -at- Arms
 
Message from our President
 
May 2016
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To contact us:
rotarynorwoodma@gmail.com   *    P.O. Box 763 Norwood, MA 02062
 
Club Information

Welcome to the Rotary Club of Norwood
. . . Chartered April Nineteenth, 1926 . . .

Norwood

Service Above Self

We meet Wednesdays at 6:15 PM
Morse House
Norwood, MA  02062
United States
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Rotary Code of Conduct
 
Code of Conduct
 
As a Rotarian, I will
  1. Exemplify the core value of integrity in all behaviors and activities
  2. Use my vocational experience and talents to serve in Rotary
  3. Conduct all of my personal, business, and professional affairs ethically, encouraging and fostering high ethical standards as an example to others
  4. Be fair in all dealings with others and treat them with the respect due to them as fellow human beings
  5. Promote recognition and respect for all occupations which are useful to society
  6. Offer my vocational talents: to provide opportunities for young people, to work for the relief of the special needs of others, and to improve the quality of life in my community
  7. Honor the trust that Rotary and fellow Rotarians provide and not do anything that will bring disfavor or reflect adversely on Rotary of fellow Rotarians
  8. Not seek from a fellow Rotarian a privilege or advantage not normally accorded others in business or professional relationship
 
 
 
Immediate  Past President: Shruthi Nagarajiah 
President:  Bill Pudsey
V. P. Pres. Elect: Kevin Bean
Secretary: Tom Colamaria
Treasurer: Wayne Zaffts
Sergeant-at-Arms: PeterStrano
Foundation Ch: Martha Colamaria
Membership Ch: Shruthi Nagarajiah
Public Relations: Mariam Nijo
Finances / Fundraising: Maurice Daaboul 
Service Proj. Ch: Martha Colamaria
Club Administration: Tom Colamaria
Website Admin: Tom Colamaria
Bulletin Editor: Tom Colamaria
 

 
 
March 16, 30
April 13, 27 
May 11, 25 
June 8, 22 
 

 
 
The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise, and in particular, to encourage and foster: ONE. The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service; SECOND. High ethical standards in business and professions, the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations and the dignifying of each Rotarian's occupation as an opportunity to serve society; THIRD. The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian's personal, business, and community life; FOURTH. The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service.
 

 
 
One of the most widely printed and quoted statements of business ethics in the world is the Rotary "4-Way Test."It was created by Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor in 1932 when he was asked to take charge of the Chicago-based Club Aluminum Company, which was facing bankruptcy. Taylor looked for a way to save the struggling company mired in depression-caused financial difficulties. He drew up a 24-word code of ethics for all employees to follow in their business and professional lives. The 4-Way Test became the guide for sales, production, advertising and all relations with dealers and customers, and the survival of the company was credited to this simple philosophy. Herb Taylor became President of Rotary International during 1954-1955. The 4-Way Test was adopted by Rotary in 1943 and has been translated into more than 100 languages and published in thousands of ways. The message should be known and followed by all Rotarians. "Of the things we think say or do: 1. Is it the TRUTH? 2. Is it FAIR to all concerned? 3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS? 4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?"
 
 

 
 
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The Rote

The Rote Autumn 2014
Oct 18, 2014
 
 
 
 
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